Cannabis researchers say it’s high time to drop ‘lazy stoner’ stereotype

Cannabis researchers say it’s high time to drop ‘lazy stoner’ stereotype

A recent study published in the International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology has challenged the stereotype of cannabis users being "lazy stoners." The study, conducted by researchers from the University of Cambridge, University College London, and King's College London, compared the levels of apathy (loss of motivation) and anhedonia (loss of interest in or pleasure from rewards) between cannabis users and non-users. The study included 274 adolescents and adults who had used cannabis at least once a week for the past three months, and a group of non-users matched for age and gender. The results showed that cannabis users did not report higher levels of apathy or anhedonia than non-users, and in fact scored slightly lower on anhedonia, indicating that they were able to enjoy activities more. The study also found no relationship between frequency of cannabis use and either apathy or anhedonia. However, the researchers noted that their study could not rule out the possibility that heavier cannabis use, such as in those with cannabis use disorder, may affect motivation. Additionally, adolescents in the study reported higher levels of apathy and anhedonia than adults, regardless of cannabis use.

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